nation state attacks and ransomware on the rise

Are you Prepared for a Rise in Nation State Attacks and Ransomware in 2020?

Once you know what you’re up against, keeping your business safe might be easier than you think. In this blog, we’re going to look at two kinds of cyber threats: nation state cyber attacks and ransomware. Neither is a new concern, but both are increasing in sophistication and prevalence. Many businesses feel powerless to protect against these events, and yet a list of relatively simple steps could keep you protected in the event of an attack.

Staying Vigilant Against Nation State Actors

According to the 2019 Verizon Data Breach study, nation state attacks have increased from 12 percent of attacks in 2017 to 23 percent in 2018.

One of the most important things to recognize about nation state attacks is that it is getting harder to ascertain where these attacks are coming from. Attackers learn to cleverly obfuscate their attacks through mimicking other state actor behavior, tools, and coding and through layers of hijacked, compromised networks. In some cases, they work through proxy actors. This makes the process of attribution very difficult. One good example is the 2018 Olympics in Pyongyang, where attackers launched the malware Olympic Destroyer. This took down the Olympic network’s wireless access points, servers, ticketing system, and even reporters Internet access for 12 hours, immediately prior to the start of the games. While at first, metadata in the malware was thought to attribute the attack to North Korea, this was actually down to manipulations of the code. Much later, researchers realized it was of Russian origin.

These ‘false flag’ attacks have a number of benefits for the perpetrators. Firstly, the real source of the threat may never be discovered. Secondly, even if the correct attribution is eventually found, the news cycle has died down, the exposure is less, and many people may not believe the new evidence.

This has contributed to nation state actors feeling confident to launch larger and more aggressive attacks, such as Russian attacks on Ukrainian power grids and communications, or the Iranian cyber-attack APT 33, that recently took down more than 30,000 Saudi oil production laptops and servers.

Ransomware often Attacks the Vulnerable, including Local Government and Hospitals

State sponsored attacks have the clout to do damage where it hurts the most, as seen by the two largest ransomware attacks ever experienced, WannaCry and NotPetya. These were created using what was allegedly a stolen US NSA tool kit called EternalBlue, as well as a French password stealer called Mimikatz.

This strength, combined with the tight budgets and flat networks of local governments and healthcare systems, is a recipe for catastrophe. Hospitals in particular are known for having flat networks and medical devices based on legacy and end-of-life operating systems. According to some estimates, hospitals are the targets of up to 70% of all ransomware incidents. The sensitive nature of PII and health records and the direct impact on safety and human life makes the healthcare industry a lucrative target for hackers looking to get their ransom paid by attacking national infrastructure.

As attackers become increasingly brazen, and go after organizations that are weak-placed to stand up to the threat, it’s more important than ever that national infrastructure thinks about security, and takes steps to handle these glaring gaps.

Shoring Up Your Defenses is Easier Than You Think

The party line often seems to be that attackers are getting smarter and more insidious, and data centers are too complex to handle this threat. It’s true that today’s networks are more dynamic and interconnected, and that new attack vectors and methods to hide these risks are cropping up all the time. However, what businesses miss, is the handful of very achievable and even simple steps that can help to limit the impact of an attack, and perhaps even prevent the damage occurring in the first place.

Here’s what enterprises can do:

  • Create an Incident Response Plan: Make sure that anyone can understand what to do in case of an incident, not just security professionals. Think about the average person on your executive board, or even your end users. You need to assume that a breach or a ransomware attack will happen, you just don’t know when. With this mindset, you’ll be more likely to create a thorough plan for incident response, including drills and practice runs.
  • Protect your Credentials: This starts with utilizing strong passwords and two-factor authentication, improving the posture around credentials in general. On top of this, the days of administrative rights are over. Every user should have only the access they need, and no further. This stops bad actors from escalating privileges and moving laterally within your data center, taking control of your devices.
  • Think Smart on Security Hygiene: Exploits based on the Eternal Blue tool kit – the Microsoft SMB v1 vulnerability, were able to cause damage because of a patch that had been released by Microsoft by May 2017. Software vulnerabilities can be avoided through patching, vulnerability testing, and certification.
  • Software-Defined Segmentation: If we continue the mindset that an attack will occur, it’s important to be set up to limit the blast radius of your breach. Software-defined segmentation is the smartest way to do this. Without any need to make infrastructure changes, you can isolate and protect your critical applications. This also works to protect legacy or end-of-life systems that are business critical but cannot be secured with existing modern solutions, a common problem in the healthcare industry. Also unlike VLANs and cloud security groups these take no physical infrastructure changes and take hours not months to implement.

Following this Advice for Critical Infrastructure

This advice is a smart starting point for national infrastructure as well as enterprises, but it needs more planning and forethought. When it comes to critical infrastructure, your visibility is essential, especially as you are likely to have multiple platforms and geographies. The last thing you want is to try to make one cohesive picture out of multiple platform-specific disparate solutions.

It’s also important to think about modern day threat vectors. Today, attacks can come through IP connected IoT devices or networks, and so your teams need to be able to detect non-traditional server compute nodes.

Incident response planning is much harder on a governmental or national level, and therefore needs to be taken up a notch in preparation. You may well need local, state, and national participation and buy-in for your drills, including law enforcement and emergency relief in case of panic or disruption. How are you going to communicate and share information on both a local and international scale, and who will have responsibility for what areas of your incident response plan?

Learning from the 2018 Olympics

Attacks against local government, critical infrastructure and national systems such as healthcare are inevitable in today’s threat landscape. The defenses in place, and the immediate response capabilities will be the difference between disaster and quick mitigation.

The 2018 Olympics can serve as proof. Despite Russia’s best attempts, the attack was thwarted within 12 hours. A strong incident response plan was put into place to find the malware and come up with signatures and remediation scripts within one hour. 4G access points had been put in place to provide networking capabilities, and the machines at the venue were reimaged from backups.

We can only hope that Qatar 2022 is already rehearsing as strong an incident response plan for its upcoming Olympics, especially with radical ‘semi-state actors’ in the region such as the Cyber Caliphate Army and the Syrian Electronic Army who could act as a proxy for a devastating state actor attack.

We Can Be Just as Skilled as the Attackers

The attitude that ‘there’s nothing we can do’ to protect against the growth in nation state attacks and ransomware threats is not just unhelpful, it’s also untrue. We have strong security tools and procedures at our disposal, we just need to make sure that we put these into place. These steps are not complicated, and they don’t take years or even months to implement. Staying ahead of the attackers is a simple matter of taking these steps seriously, and using our vigilance to limit the impact of an attack when it happens.

Want to understand more about how software defined segmentation can make a real difference in the event of a cyber attack? Check out this webinar.

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